DNP Evidence-Based Population Health Projects

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Population Health Evidence-Based Project award creates opportunities for the advanced nursing practice community to collectively meet the challenges of improving the population’s health. This program is designed to facilitate the development of qualified, knowledgeable, and experienced advanced nursing practice students with experience and focus on integration of population health into their practice and to improve health outcomes.  AACN has made awards to ten projects submitted by DNP students.
  

Funded Projects

Effect of Community/Public Health Nurses in Hypertension Prevention and Control
Dr. Jennifer Cooper (Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies)

Project Title: Effect of Community/Public Health Nurses in Hypertension Prevention and Control 

Student: Dr. Jennifer Cooper is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Hood College in Frederick, MD and previously taught community/public health nursing adjunct faculty at Marymount University School of Health Professions and Georgetown University School of Nursing and Health Studies. She works as a Program Manager for the Assocation of Public Health Nurses on various chronic disease projects. Dr. Cooper received her BSN from Cedarville University, her MSN from Rush University, and her DNP from The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. 

Project Summary: Jennifer Cooper's, DNP, RN, APHN-BC, CCP, DNP Evidence-Based Project focused on a local public health and parish nurse partnership in western Maryland. As one of several projects within the ASTHO Million Hearts State Learning Collaborative, Washington County's local health department and Meritus Health's Parish Nurse Network offered a three-month intervention monitoring blood pressure and coaching lifestyle for those at risk and with hypertension in 2014 & 2015. Dr. Cooper completed a secondary data analysis of data collected by faith community nurses. This work was published in Public Health Nursing in 2017. Dr. Cooper continues to work with the Meritus Parish Nurse Network and the Association of Public Health Nurses to disseminate outcomes from this project and promote faith community and public health partnerships.

An Evidence-Based Strategy to Identify and Manage Substance Use in Cancer Patients
Student: Amanda Choflet (John Hopkins University School of Nursing)

Project Title: An Evidence-Based Strategy to Identify and Manage Substance Use in Cancer Patients 

Student: Amanda Choflet is the Nurse Manager in the Radiation Oncology department at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She has worked as an oncology nurse for over ten years, spanning inpatient and outpatient care delivery as well as medical, surgical, and radiation oncology. She is also a clinical instructor in the community and public health nursing program at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing. As a graduate student, she interned at the Center for Health Policy and Healthcare Transformation and has presented on health policy topics to student groups, visiting guests, and nursing leadership at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Her recent clinical focus has been to develop strategies for providing supportive care to eliminate disparities in cancer outcomes. 

Project Summary: Alcohol and illicit substance use (AISU) in cancer patients constitute a threat to safety and quality of life, and patients who use substances during cancer treatment represent an opportunity to improve wellness in a vulnerable population. Currently, cancer providers and patients have little information or guidance as to the best way to manage risky substance use during cancer treatment. A program that incorporates screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) as part of routine patient care in the oncology setting is likely to improve patient outcomes. The radiation oncology department of a large academic institution seeks to implement an SBIRT program for all new patients.  

This project will empower cancer patients to address their substance use by establishing an evidence-based strategy for identifying and managing alcohol and illicit substance use during cancer treatment. The implementation plan includes motivational interviewing training, the development of clinical pathways, and risk-based intervention toolkits that will incorporate oncology-specific resources. The project will increase screening and assessment of substance use in cancer patients at the initiation of cancer therapy. It will also increase the number of brief interventions and referrals to therapy. Finally, the project will improve the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of oncology providers to identify and manage substance use in their patients.

Intention to Breastfeed and Intervention Effectiveness in the African American Community
Cynethia Bethel Jaiteh (Northern Kentucky University)

Project Title: Intention to Breastfeed and Intervention Effectiveness in the African American Community 

Student: Cynethia Bethel Jaiteh (Northern Kentucky University) 

Project Summary: Healthcare providers are challenged to increase breastfeeding initiation and continuation of breastfeeding rates for African American women. Breastfeeding initiation has increased in African Americans. However, African American women have the lowest prevalence of breastfeeding initiation and duration, stressing the need for targeted interventions to promote and support breastfeeding (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2013). Breastfeeding friendly prenatal exposure and education may have an impact on intention to breastfeed. The purpose of the study is to examine the effect of breastfeeding friendly prenatal exposure and breastfeeding education on infant feeding intentions in pregnant African American women.

Utilization of Multiple Strategies in the Self-care Management of Chronic Diseases: A Longitudinal Quality Improvement Project
Marcia Johansson (University of South Florida)

Project: Utilization of Multiple Strategies in the Self-care Management of Chronic Diseases: A Longitudinal Quality Improvement Project 

Student: Dr. Marcia Johansson is an assistant professor at the University of South Florida. She has been an Acute Care Nurse Practitioner for 19 years. Her practice areas include vascular surgery and the intensive care units including surgical, cardiac, and eICU. She is the interim adult gerontology acute care concentration director for both masters and DNP students. Her clinical interests are cardiology, education, and telemedicine. She is actively involved in the Society of Critical Care Medicine and sits on two committees. 

Project Summary: The aims of this project are to increase client knowledge of HF, improve self-care, and thereby, decrease HF readmission rates to the hospital for participants in the Program of All-inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE) in Pinellas County, Florida. PACE is one of the facilities under the ACA loosing revenue for HF admissions and they are interested in having their members with HF participate in this project. The benefits of this project are increase knowledge to participants and ultimately improve their health.

Educating First Responders to Identify, Provide Care, and Protect Victims of Human Trafficking
Mary Hoft (East Tennessee State University)

Project: Educating First Responders to Identify, Provide Care, and Protect Victims of Human Trafficking 

Student: Mary Hoft is a family psychiatric nurse practitioner at a comprehensive psychiatric care center in Cincinnati, Ohio with faculty status at the University of Cincinnati. She has worked in numerous nursing specialty areas including medical/surgical, maternal/child, home health, and community health. She will graduate with her DNP from East Tennessee State University in May 2017. Her area of focus and expertise for both master’s and doctoral programs has been abuse trauma in children, adolescents, and young adults. 

Project Summary: The purpose of this project is to educate first responders from eight count agencies (domestic violence shelter, child advocacy center, law enforcement, court system, emergency department, health department, high school, and children’s protective services) to identify, provide care, and protect victims of human trafficking. Staff will be educated to (a) identify victims using an evidence-based screening protocol, (b) assess for victim needs and refer for appropriate services, and (c) decide course of action for protecting victims, either through mandated reporting for minors under 18, and referral to National Human Trafficking Resource Center hotline or local services for immediate safety.

Does implementation of community-based educational strategies increase Tdap vaccination rates in pregnant women?
Ginny Wurttemberg and Cari McAlister (University of Alabama)

Project: Does implementation of community-based educational strategies increase Tdap vaccination rates in pregnant women? 

Students: Ginny Wurttemberg and Cari McAlister (University of Alabama) 

Project Summary: The project aims to partner with community-based programs to increase tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination rates in pregnant women. The objective is to decrease the risk of pertussis in neonates less than three months old through passive immunity. The mother receiving the Tdap vaccination between 27 and 36 weeks gestation can accomplish this. By utilizing community-based programs all pregnant women including teenagers, uninsured Americans, and the uninsured and or undocumented Hispanic women will be educated and given the opportunity to obtain the Tdap vaccine at a free or discounted price.

Reducing Heart Failure 30-day Readmission Rates through Nurse Led Interventions “Bridging the Gap in Heart Failure Patient Care”
Sheryl Aiken (Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing)

Project: Reducing Heart Failure 30-day Readmission Rates through Nurse Led Interventions “Bridging the Gap in Heart Failure Patient Care” 

Student: Sheryl Aiken (Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing)

Project Summary: The purpose of this project is to investigate the impact that post discharge coaching calls made by nurses 24-48 hours after discharge, and weekly, for a total of four weeks using a standardized tool, impacts 30-day readmission rates. The objective of these calls is to ensure that once the patient has been discharged to home, they have the proper tools and resources needed to manage their chronic illness available to them. For example, do they have a digital scale? Do they understand their medication, fluid and dietary restriction instructions? Do they have a follow up appointment and transportation?

Improving the Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Screening Process Using the Shared Decision Making (SDM) Model
Mallory Miner (Idaho State University)

Project: Improving the Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Screening Process Using the Shared Decision Making (SDM) Model

Student: Mallory Miner (Idaho State University) 

Project Summary: The purpose of the Scholarly Project is to pilot test an education program for PHNs in the use of SDM communication strategies and visual aids designed to support mutual (nurse and patient) decision making for STD screening during a woman’s wellness exam. The objectives are: 1) to increase PHNs’ perception of effectively delivering four key steps in the SDM approach to patient education, 2) to gain insights into the strengths and limitations of a brief education program on using SDM strategies with visual aids, and 3) to increase STD screening performed during a woman’s wellness exam.

Advanced Practice Nurse led Transitional Care Program to Prevent Hospital Readmissions
Kala Sugathan (Arizona State University)

Project: Advanced Practice Nurse led Transitional Care Program to Prevent Hospital Readmissions 

Student: Kala Sugathan (Arizona State University) 

Project Summary: Hospital readmissions with heart failure place a heavy financial burden on the United States health care system. Repeated admissions have a negative impact on the patient’s life, impair self management, and reduce functional status. A pilot program will be conducted in a family practice clinic to evaluate the effectiveness of home visit with supplemental telephonic calls in lowering the rate of readmissions. The expected benefits include improved patient outcomes and communication between the hospital and primary care providers, reduced length of hospital stay, lower morbidity and mortality rates, high quality service and reduced health care costs.

Comprehensive Reproductive Health Education for an Urban All-Girls Secondary School in an Underserved Community
Jaytonya Chenelle Manget (Duke University)

Project: Comprehensive Reproductive Health Education for an Urban All-Girls Secondary School in an Underserved Community 

Student: Jaytonya Chenelle Manget (Duke University) 

Project Summary: The purpose of this project is to implement an evidenced based reproductive health curriculum into an all-girls school that is collocated in a facility with a primary care pediatric medical home. The goal of the project is to increase student knowledge regarding sexual intercourse and contraceptive options and ultimately to delay the age of sexarche and improve teen pregnancy rates in Wards 7 and 8 of Washington D.C. More specifically this project hopes to increase knowledge of young adolescent girls enrolled in the target middle school 75% through the use of a comprehensive curriculum.